ADB, Biofuels, Biogas, Clean Energy, Cleantech venture capital, Climate Change, Green Building, Green chemicals, Hybrid, Hydro, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Myanmar, Renewable Energy, Singapore, Small-hydro, Solar, Solar Thermal, Thin-film Solar, Wind

More investment in cleantech is needed (Business Times)

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The following was published on December 5, 2012.  By Ron Mahabir

SINGAPORE SHOULD INVEST MORE HEAVILY IN CLEANTECH

AS WE speed dangerously along the highway of global economic growth, it has become awfully clear that we are headed for major accidents in food, water and other resource shortages, as well as increasing environmental disasters.

We just have had way too many red alerts in recent years including Fukushima, Gulf of Mexico, Katrina, floods and heat waves to not take these a great deal more seriously. It is probably more than coincidence that 2012 is on track to be the hottest year in the United States and Hurricane Sandy was the largest Atlantic hurricane on record. Continue reading

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Air Pollution, Carbon Credits, China, Clean Energy, Cleantech venture capital, Climate Change, Conservation, Emissions Reduction, Energy Efficiency, Hydro, Legislation, Renewable Energy, Solar, Solar Thermal, U.S., Wind

China Goes Climate Cool

Spring 2008 (YES! Magazine, Anna Fahey) – Last summer, Chinese President Hu Jintao toured the country in short sleeves to show that his countrymen could turn their air conditioners down. In China, conservation is “in.” Fashions do change.

Global warming denial is out of vogue. Unfortunately, though, the climate change do-nothing set is sporting a new line: “Why should we bother fighting climate change when China’s emissions are increasing?”

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Biodiesel, Biofuels, Biogas, Biomass, Carbon capture, Carbon Credits, Clean Energy, Cleantech venture capital, Climate Change, Coal, Conservation, Crude Palm Oil, Energy Efficiency, Ethanol, GHG, Legislation, LNG, Recycling, Renewable Energy, Small-hydro, Solar, Solar Thermal, Thailand, Transportation, Waste Management, Waste to Energy, Wind

Thailand’s greener energy future

February 11, 2008 (Bangkok Post) – To cope with high oil prices and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, Thailand must pursue four options: development of renewable energy, energy efficiency, nuclear energy and carbon capture and storage. However, renewable energy has certain limitations, and options for each country are different depending on availability of natural resources, technologies and manpower. This is why the Thai government has mainly concentrated on renewable energy based on domestic raw materials and wastes.

Financial incentives together with the provision of information to investors and consumers have proved to work wonders, for instance in the promotion of biofuels. The consumption of gasohol (E10) more than doubled in 2007. With the introduction of E20 in 2008, daily demand for ethanol should reach two million litres by 2011 when new cars capable of using E85 should be on sale.

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Air Pollution, Clean Energy, Cleantech venture capital, Climate Change, Coal, Conservation, Emissions Reduction, Energy Efficiency, Hydro, Legislation, LNG, Oil, Renewable Energy, Singapore, Solar, Solar Thermal

6 Key steps to meet Singapore’s energy needs

February 10, 2008 (Lin Yanqin and Esther Fung) Spiralling oil prices, growing global demand for energy, limited and uncertain supplies from oil-producing countries, climate change from greenhouse gas emissions – these are the challenges faced by a Singapore dependent on imports for energy needs.But even if Singapore has to be a “price-taker” in meeting its energy needs, it can still turn “energy challenges” into “energy opportunities”.

To help make this happen, a master plan – outlined in the National Energy Policy Report – was unveiled by the Minister for Trade and Industry Lim Hng Kiang yesterday, with six strategies mapped out for Singapore’s energy future.

Steps will be taken to improve energy security by diversifying energy sources and the mix of fuels currently used to generate electricity. Plans are also in place to grow the value-add of the energy industry, now worth 20 billion, into a $34-billion industry by 2015, and triple the number of jobs to 15,300.

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China, Cleantech venture capital, Solar, Solar Thermal

China Solar Energy Industry Research and Forecast, 2008-2010

January 11, 2008 (EnergyAsia) – A new study, “China Solar Energy Industry Research and Forecast 2008-2010” has just been released, said online retailer Research and Markets Inc. China is expected to emerge as one of the greatest solar energy production bases in the world after 2008. Conditions are already in place in China for the large scale development and exploitation of solar energy. Continue reading

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China, Cleantech venture capital, Solar Thermal

Goldman Sachs and CDH Join Forces in Solar Energy Co.

Jan 14, 2008 (SinoCast via COMTEX) Shandong Himin Solar Energy Group Co, Ltd. is to speed up its IPO with the help of international investment companies. The private solar water heater and vacuum tube producer signed a letter of intent with Goldman Sachs, and CDH Investments on January 10, 2008, according to which its two partners will first inject USD$100 million into the company.

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Biofuels, Biomass, Carbon Credits, China, Clean Energy, Cleantech venture capital, EU, Geothermal, Hydro, Solar, Solar Thermal, U.S., Wind

2007: Did We Reach the Tipping Point?

January 7, 2008 (Renewable Energy Access) – At the beginning of each year, as the renewable energy industry looks back on its progress over the previous 12 months, the phrase “tipping point” always seems to enter the discussion. But how will we know when renewables have truly hit that tipping point?Will one quarter of the world’s electricity come from renewable resources? Will more investment go into clean energy than into the fossil energy industries? There’s no agreed upon standard for how to define a turning tide, but one thing is certain: 2007 clearly proved that there is a major change underway in how the world produces and consumes energy.

“If 2007 isn’t the tipping point, we are close to that,” says Janet Sawin, Director of the Energy and Climate Change program at the Worldwatch Institute in Washington, DC. “This has been a truly remarkable year, and we’re seeing impressive development figures worldwide.”

According to a REN21 2007 Renewables Global Status Report due out in February, there are now 237 gigawatts (GW) of electrical generation capacity from renewable resources online around the world.

When breaking that total capacity down among technologies, wind leads with 93 GW of total installed capacity; small hydro has 73 GW; biomass has 44 GW; geothermal has 10 GW; and PV has just under 8 GW of total installed capacity. While renewables still only make up around 5.5% of the world’s 4,300 GW of total electrical generation capacity, the REN21 report concludes that the industry “has clearly become mainstream” over the last decade. Continue reading

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